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Bus Bus Rapid Transit Minneapolis Route of the Week

Route 19: Buses and blossoms on Penn Avenue 

| Wednesday, August 07, 2013 12:37:00 PM

When Karen Bradford was young, she used to ride the bus to downtown Minneapolis with her grandmother so they could shop at the department stores lining Nicollet Mall.

Though she’s grown older, Bradford still uses the bus as her primary connection to downtown, where she shops, goes to doctor appointments or simply enjoys the city.

And she isn’t alone. On a recent afternoon, Bradford was among several customers traveling northbound on Route 19, which runs from Minneapolis to Brooklyn Center. The bus travels along Olson Memorial Highway, Penn Avenue and Osseo Road en route to the Brooklyn Center Transit Center, one of Metro Transit’s busiest boarding areas.

Last year, more than 2 million people boarded Route 19 buses, a more than 8 percent increase from 2011.

Like Bradford, many Route 19 customers say they do not own vehicles and that the bus serves as their primary mode of travel to work, school or shopping.

“This is my everyday transportation,” said Nick Lofton, 21, who lives in north Minneapolis and uses the bus to visit friends, shop and get to work. This fall, he plans to use the bus to get to and from classes at the Minneapolis Community & Technical College.

Keith and Jayme Talley use Route 19 every day, multiple times a day to fetch groceries, get to appointments and visit parks, including Theodore Wirth Park. “If we have a lot of stuff to do, we’ll be on the bus the majority of the day,” Jayme Talley said.

Because of the high, all-day demand Route 19 is part of Metro Transit’s Hi Frequency Network, with buses running every 15 minutes between downtown Minneapolis and the intersection of Penn and Lowry avenues. Midday and evening service was recently improved and morning and afternoon trips have been added to better serve customers, including Patrick Henry High School students now traveling to school with Go-To Student Passes.

Future improvements could come in the form of Arterial Bus Rapid Transit, which would move buses more quickly through the corridor by making fewer stops and using new technology like pre-paid fare payment, traffic signal priority and low-floor buses with front and rear entrances. Station areas would also be more fully developed.

Penn Avenue has been identified as the third potential Arterial Bus Rapid Transit corridor, after Snelling Avenue and West Seventh Street in St. Paul. 

Katie Roth, a project manager in Metro Transit's BRT/Small Starts Project Office, said BRT planning is just beginning but that plans could be put in motion as early as 2017. Route 19 and its branches would continue to provide local service even with the addition of BRT.

Roth said the corridor stands out for improved service because it has strong all-day ridership and is an important connection to suburban routes in the northwest metro. Estimates suggest BRT service on Penn Avenue could draw up to 9,300 weekday riders by 2030.

BRT would come as just the latest evolution for transit on the Route 19 corridor.

Streetcars ran on Sixth Avenue North until 1940, when the road was rebuilt as Olson Memorial Highway. Portions of Penn Avenue also had streetcars until 1953. Until 2007, two routes served Penn Avenue — Route 19, which ran between Olson Memorial Highway and Golden Valley Road, and Route 5, which ran north of North 26th Avenue. Continuous service on Penn Avenue was implemented as part of a service restructuring in the northwest metro.

As Metro Transit prepares for the next evolution, it is participating in Hennepin County's Penn Avenue Community Works project, designed to enhance the corridor through a series of community-building projects. The Community Works project is focused on the area between Interstate 394 and the intersection of Osseo Road and 49th Avenue North.

One community-focused investment already in place is 'Blossoms of Hope,' a bus shelter that also serves as a striking piece of public art. Designed by landscape artist Marjorie Pitz and located at Broadway and Penn avenues, large metal flowers sprout from the top of the bus shelter adding color and life to the busy intersection (the shelter itself is meant to mimic a vase, Pitz said).

The flowers were installed shortly before the 2011 tornado struck Minneapolis, damaging several surrounding properties. After surviving relatively unscathed, the flowers became a "beacon of hope" and have persisted as a welcoming and encouraging landmark ever since, Pitz said.

"I wanted to make it (the shelter) into an attraction that would actually lift peoples' spirits when they came to wait for the bus," she said. "It's very joyful, colorful and happy."

Route 19 At a Glance

Type: Urban Local 

Service: Route 19 runs between downtown Minneapolis and Bass Lake Road in Brooklyn Center, largely along Olson Memorial Highway, Penn Avenue and Osseo Road. As part of Metro Transit’s Hi Frequency network, buses run every 15 minutes between downtown Minneapolis and the Lowry Avenue-Penn Avenue intersection between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. weekdays.

Route length: 8 miles

Stops:  79 northbound stops and 82 southbound stops

Vehicles: 40-foot standard buses

Ridership: Customers rode Route 19 more than 2 million times in 2012 — making it the tenth most-popular bus route. Average weekday ridership exceeds 6,400.

History: Buses began running on Penn Avenue after streetcars were taken out of service in 1953. Until Express Route 758 was introduced a decade ago, Route 19 buses ran west to Golden Valley. Penn Avenue was covered by two separate routes until 2007, when Route 19 was continued north to the Brooklyn Center Transit Center.

Future: Metro Transit has identified Penn Avenue as strong corridor for Arterial Bus Rapid Transit service. Preliminary planning is ongoing and implementation could come as early as 2017. BRT would improve travel times through the use of pre-paid fares and low-floor, front- and rear-entrance buses. Enhanced stations would also be built. 

Bus Express Bus Fares Good Question Light Rail

Good Question: Why does it cost more to ride during rush hour? 

| Tuesday, August 06, 2013 3:43:00 PM

This week’s Good Question comes from Sarah Graves (@sarahteal), who asked: Why does it cost more to ride during rush hour?

In the Twin Cities metro, transit fares are lower during off-peak hours to encourage transit use throughout the entire day and balance the demand for buses, drivers and related support. Currently, about half of Metro Transit ridership occurs during rush hours.

Since 2008, non-rush hour fares have been $1.75 on local bus routes, the METRO Blue Line and the METRO Red Line. This is 50 cents lower than $2.25 the rush hour fares in effect during the peak commuter travel periods of 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. each weekday. Fares on those express bus trips that operate during rush hours are 75 cents lower during non-rush hours ($2.25 instead of $3).

Separate fares for rush hour and non-rush hour periods have been in place at Metro Transit since 1982 and are not uncommon among U.S. transit agencies. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit and King County Metro Transit, in Seattle, are among the agencies that offer reduced price fares during non-rush hour periods.  

The Metropolitan Council is responsible for establishing the fare policy and rates for all regional transit service. The agency regularly reviews fare structure and policies based on factors such as demographic trends, technology and shifts in methods of fare payment. A number of new fare tools have been introduced in recent years such as the Student Pass, 7-Day Pass. Auto Refill and advance sales of the Northstar Family Pass are other examples of how technology has changed fare payment.

> Metro Transit fares

> The proof is in the payment

> Go-To Cards used to pay fares at record rate

Have a ‘Good Question’? Email it to goodquestion@metrotransit.org.

Bus Express Bus In the News Light Rail

Fact Book tells Metro Transit's story by the numbers 

| Tuesday, August 06, 2013 12:57:00 PM

How many square miles do Metro Transit's buses and trains cover? How many commuter rail cars are there on the Northstar Commuter Rail line? And how many items arrive at Metro Transit's Lost & Found every year?

The answers to those questions — and much more  can be found in the 2012 Metro Transit Fact Book, now available online. Other numbers featured in the Fact Book include:

127  the total number of Metro Transit routes, including the METRO Blue Line, Northstar and urban local, express and suburban bus routes.

30 million  the number of real-time departures requested using NexTrip in 2012.

12,360  the total number of Metro Transit bus stops.

270 — the number of regional employers participating in the Metropass program.

The Fact Book provides an at-a-glance illustration of the growing Metro Transit system.

Recent profiles provide a more in-depth look at the growth. In its August issue, Minnesota Business gave a rundown of recent transit improvements and the impact they're having on local entrepreneurs. Community Transportation magazine also profiled Metro Transit in their story, "The Twin Cities' Transit Awakening."

> Mid-year Progress Report: On the Right Track

> About Metro Transit

Safety Transit Police

New officers, new diversity for Metro Transit police 

| Monday, August 05, 2013 10:49:00 AM

As new immigrants to the United States, Abdulkhayr Hirse and Salah Ahmed relied heavily on transit to get to work and school.

A few short years later, their experience is coming full circle. The Somali-born men were among 19 new full-time Metro Transit police officers sworn in on Friday, Aug. 2, as the department welcomed one of the most diverse groups of new hires in the history of the 20-year-old organization.

With their hire, the department now includes four Somali officers, including the first Somali sergeant in the country, Waheid Siraach. Mukhtar Abdulkadir, who was also born in Somalia, was among 22 part-time officers who joined Metro Transit Police this spring.

Following Friday’s ceremony Hirse and Ahmed said they were excited to begin their new roles, serving as role models for young Somalis as well as ambassadors to the wider transit community. As with all transit police, they will be responsible for patrolling light rail and commuter trains, buses and station areas and will play a key role policing the METRO Green Line when it opens next year.  

“We’re here because we want to change someone’s life, or at least make their day or night a little bit better,” said Hirse, who worked in security after moving from Kenya to the United States in 1998.  

Ahmed, who previously worked as a probation officer and park ranger, said he was eager to join the force because it will allow him to have more interactions with community members. “It’s not just about sitting in a squad car but getting out and talking to people, connecting with the public,” he said.

The visibility could encourage other young Somalis to consider law enforcement as a career as well, said Siraach, who joined the department nearly six years ago and was named acting sergeant in July.

“It’ll be a great thing for them to have somebody to look up to,” he said. “This is really exciting for us and it makes us better as an agency.”

For Police Chief John Harrington, the department’s growing diversity represents a “changing of the guards” that will be key to building bridges in the community. This year, the department has made a point of increasing time spent on the streets doing beat work and connecting with community groups at events like Tuesday's National Night Out (Transit Police plan to attend 50 events in Minneapolis and St. Paul).

With transit customers speaking dozens of different languages, Harrington said it’s vital for officers to reflect and be able to relate to the people they serve. Officers in the new class speak Arabic, Spanish and Somali.

“People come here from every point on the globe,” he said addressing the officers at Friday’s ceremony. “Today, as you go forth from here, you will bring a new meaning to the phrase, ‘By the people, for the people, of the people.’”

General Manager Brian Lamb echoed the sentiment. Besides introducing more diversity, Lamb said the department’s growth will allow officers to take a more proactive approach to policing and ensure Metro Transit customers feel safe and welcome. There are now 83 full-time Metro Transit police officers and 59 part-time officers.  

“It’s easy to be focused on the problems at hand, but that will only get us part of the way there,” he said.

Another 26 part-time officers will be hired this fall. Acting Lt. Jason Lindner, who oversaw the hiring of the new class, said the department received more than 500 applications when it advertised the new jobs earlier this year.

The response was due in part to greater outreach, something Lindner said would continue as the department continues to grow.

“It’s really important for every class to get a good cross-section of people,” he said. “That’s what’s going to allow us to be able to hit more areas than we ever have.”

> Star Tribune: New officers join Metro Transit police force

> Coverage by Mogadishu Times, Hiiraan Online

> Metro Transit Police Department 

Top left: Abdulkhayr Hirse poses with St. Paul and Minneapolis police officers prior to the Metro Transit Police Department's swearing in ceremony on Friday. Bottom right: Salah Ahmed poses with an officer from the Dakota County Sheriff Department on Friday.

Bus Good Question

Good Question: Why is there no Route 1? 

| Thursday, August 01, 2013 9:30:00 AM

There’s a Route 2. There are also routes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. But there is no Route 1. Why? Good question.                      

Steve Legler, Metro Transit's assistant director of Service Development, believes the answer goes back to the mid-1950s, when Twin City Lines began numbering routes following the conversion from unnumbered streetcars to buses. At that time, the Route 1 moniker went to an infrequent route that ran between Bryn Mawr and northeast Minneapolis.

Bryn Mawr later was served by Route 9 while Route 1 began running to south Minneapolis. More service changes that took place 15 years ago led Route 1 to be renumbered as Route 25. Legler remembers that decision came because the Route 1 label inferred an importance its ridership didn’t necessarily support.

At the time, he says, planners suggested renumbering popular Route 16 as Route 1, but decided against it, believing there would be confusion and that it could be difficult to distinguish on overhead signs.

The Route 1 void has persisted ever since. Why it hasn’t been affixed to any service – or may never be – is a good question for which there is no clear answer.

One theory promoted by Manager of Route Planning Cyndi Harper: its implied status renders it unusable. Like parents with multiple children, she says, all of Metro Transit’s routes are loved equally!

Have a ‘Good Question’? Email it to goodquestion@metrotransit.org.

> WCCO's Jason DeRusha tackles a viewer's Good Question about the numbering of bus routes

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